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Three Star Reviews

Book Review | Seasons of Waiting

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Seasons of Waiting: Walking by Faith When Dreams are Delayed
by Betsy Childs Howard

Waiting is one thing most Christians have experienced before, and something most of us complain about.  Waiting stretches us.  It tests faith and reveals character.  It shows whether we deep-down trust God or not.  And, it’s usually uncomfortable. I’ve been through my own long waits for provision and fulfilled promises before, so I was excited to read Seasons of Waiting by Betsy Childs Howard.  seasonsofwaiting

Overall, I felt her outlook on waiting offered a new, big-picture perspective.  She argues that what we wait for in the here-and-now illustrates how all of creation longed for a Savior and how we are all still longing for the return of Christ.  This made me realize how my own waiting means far more than just character-building or faith-growing in my own life.  I wait with creation. I wait with all humanity.  It helps me to pray in a new way and tap into a greater longing for God Himself rather than just whatever I’ve been seeking.

After an initial introduction to the greater context of waiting, Howard then offers a series of chapters on specific things many people wait a long time for:  Marriage, Children, Healing, a Home. This section of the book was, to me, okay.  I felt disappointed in the content because those aren’t really how I’m finding myself waiting.  It appears that this book was launched after an article the author wrote for The Gospel Coalition on being, at that time, a single Christian woman.  But when she transferred that to book form, it felt too audience-specific.  Howard does make attempts to broaden the audience in each chapter, reminding us that those waiting for a human husband represent the bride waiting for the return of Christ.  This was mildly helpful, but still left me wanting more.

At only 98 pages, this book ended up far shorter than I expected and didn’t really delve into the greater spiritual lessons on waiting that I wanted.  I didn’t need to read about specific waiting scenarios.  I wanted to follow the journey of those who waited in Scripture.  I wanted to know what to do in the waiting, how to pray in the waiting, how to serve others in the waiting, how to be content in the waiting, and the like.   To me, the book could have replaced the middle content with much deeper lessons on a subject we all need to learn more about since we’ve all been in a season of waiting before (or are in a season like that now). Of course, for others who are waiting for marriage, or children, etc., this book may feel particularly relevant and helpful.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Disclaimer:   Heather King is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

Book Review | The Angel Answer Book

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The Angel Answer Book by Robert Morgan

Angel Answer BookBook Description: Angels have been present since the beginning of time, yet we’re filled with more intrigue and myth than with facts about these heavenly creatures. In this practical Q&A format, bestselling author and pastor Robert J. Morgan uncovers the mystery of angels—in the teachings of the Bible, in their role in relation to Christ, how they impact Christian beliefs, and in personal accounts of our present-day lives. This is an up close and revealing look at what angels do for us as they carry out their purpose in God’s overall plan for His kingdom.

Book Review: Understanding angels is important to the Christian faith. The Angel Answer Book by Robert Morgan presents short answers, based on Biblical research, to the questions we have about these mysterious creatures. The book is very basic in theology and written for easy understanding. It covers all aspects of angelology- from the creation of angels, to their purpose and power. Fallen angels are identified and explained, including the final outcome from the Book of Revelation.

The book cover is beautifully designed and part of a series of books. It makes a nice gift for someone new to faith, or a keepsake gift for someone during difficult times. The angels are a reminder of God’s protection over His people.

My Book Rating: 3/5

To read more reviews for this book CLICK HERE

 

Disclosure: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Disclaimer:   LifeVerse Books is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

Book Review: Notes from a Blue Bike

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Notes From a Blue Bike: The Art of Living Intentionally in a Chaotic World
by Tsh Oxenreider

Notes from a Blue Bike by popular blogger, Tsh Oxenreider, shares a story of living simply and living slow.  She finishes the book well, ultimately concluding that “living intentionally ultimately means staying true to yourself and how your family is made.”  She agrees that as we surf that web and read those blogs, we’ll see different paths and perspectives on what we need to do to live this life well.  Garden this way.  Cook this way.  Educate your kids this way.  Parent this way.  We can easily get caught up in expectations and overwhelmed by failure until we simply decide what our family needs and stick with that.  No more.  No less. bluebike

It’s a lovely bit of grace at the conclusion of this book, but to get there she shares her own family’s experiences moving from Turkey to Austin, TX to Bend, Oregon. Her discussion of the Simple Life focuses on five areas:  Food, Work, Education, Travel, Entertainment and she concludes with a section on “Revival.”  Her chapters are short and easy to read.  Her prose is lovely and cozy.  Each chapter begins with a location and a date because it truly does jump from place to place and year to year in her journey.  It’s not a start-to-finish linear read.

I love that in the end she essentially gives me the freedom to choose what in this book will work for me and my family and what won’t.  But I have to admit that I wasn’t sure she’d give me that freedom.  I felt preached at for much of the book and uncomfortable with her assertions that I could pack up and travel the world with my 4 children 9 and under if I really, really wanted to.  If I truly wanted the simple life my husband could quit his regular job and find something more flexible he could do from home so we could be more jet-setting.

Her goal of spending more and more money on high-quality, locally grown, organic, fair-trade groceries isn’t something that has me jumping up and down with excitement.  She says that decades ago Americans spent 40% of their budget on groceries and how this is more ideal….it’s simply not ideal for me.

The Epilogue to the book says they were packing their family of 5 up to spend a year abroad, traveling from place to place to see the sites.  It seems a fitting end for her personal story, but thoroughly untenable and impractical for pretty much the rest of us.

I suppose what I expected from this book is something more practical, something more applicable to my life, something more personally inspiring.   Instead, it’s really her memoir or even a travelogue, but with more sweeping generalizations about buying local groceries from farmer’s markets than specific stories and vignettes.  I also hoped for something more spiritual and faith-driven, but there’s very little mention of that.  I guess in the end I felt like I had a conversation with someone who is amazing, but with whom I simply don’t have much in common.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Disclaimer: Heather King is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com